Silver Standing Liberty

1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202

1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202
1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202
1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202
1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202

1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202    1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202
&###x200B;&###x200B;&###x200B;&###x200B;&###x200B;&###x200B;&##x200B. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202. This 1923-S quarter had the lowest mintage of any San Francisco Mint emission of the raised date issues, and it has long been heralded as rare across all grades.

&###xA0;The most sought after Standing Liberty Quarters are the 1916 and 1918/7-S overdate. The third most important date is the 1923-S.

&###xA0;Only 1.36 million of the 1923-S Standing Liberty Quarter was issued, one of the lowest of all mintages in the series. In circulated grades it is second only to 1916 and the overdate in rarity. &###xA0;Mint State survivors are in limited supply, but they are proportionally more available than the mintage would suggest. Gems do appear for sale with some regularity. Though most are lacking a Full Head, 1923-S is not the rarest issue with FH.

This photo is the exact coin you will receive. I have an established coin business, and specialize in these particular coins, and I have a complete inventory of standing liberty quarters except for 1916 and 1919.

Please check back with me and you will find many more great coins. The SLQ is one of the most beautiful coins ever designed by the U. Mint, and I have many of these and desire to sell them because of their beauty. The Standing Liberty quarter was struck at the Philadelphia Mint from 1916 to 1930 with the exception only of 1922, when no quarters were struck at any mint. It was produced less regularly at Denver and San Francisco beginning in 1917. &###xA0;America was at war! World War I was raging in Europe, and at home industrial technology continued to advance at breakneck pace. A style of artistic construction called Art Nouveau, characterized by elegant, flowing lines, and new freedoms of expression, reached its peak of popularity in America, as the musty old conservative ethic of the long Victorian Era finally breathed its last gasps. Is that why this coin was designed the way it was? The first year of mintage was controversial. &###xA0;Surely placing a topless Miss Liberty on our coinage would be okay; we're an enlightened nation, right? &###xA0;The Standing Liberty Quarter design came about with a&###xA0;bare-breasted Liberty initially.

A competition was held, and several top sculptors were invited to submit designs to be considered for use on the coinage. The design selected for the quarter dollar was Hermon A.

McNeil's, which depicts Miss Liberty standing between two large pedestals, holding an olive branch in her right hand, and a shield in her left. She wears a flowing garment that slips off her right shoulder to expose her breast. &###xA0;There has been much speculation into why McNeil's design was selected and what the symbolism meant. The olive branch Liberty holds is a universal sign of peacemaking.

The shield is clearly a symbol of warfare and defense. And Liberty's exposed breast? &###xA0;Was this wartime propaganda meant to imply, come get your succor from the breast of the world's mother? " Or was it meant to say, "I come in peace, opening myself to you in earnestness? History does not record the answer. On January 17 of 1917, the bare-breasted Standing Liberty Quarter finally entered circulation, and the outcry was immediate and loud. Religious leaders used words like "obscene" and "filthy" to describe the visage of our beautiful Miss Liberty with her breast exposed. &###xA0;Citizens' groups rallied their memberships to lobby Congress to have the disgusting coin recalled.

&###xA0;Congress had little choice but to submit to the clamor. The bare-breasted Liberty Quarters began disappearing from circulation, and this Type 1 design was replaced by Type Two, where she is covered, during the production for 1917.

The Standing Liberty Quarter needed a third design change starting in 1925 because the date was wearing off too quickly. Type Two were made from 1917 through 1924.

In Type Three, the design was re-cut so that the date was recessed, rather than raised. A summary of the Standing Liberty Quarter types. Type Two have the three stars below the eagle.

The 13 stars on the reverse were revised several times. In early mockups, MacNeil placed them on either side of the eagle, both in the field and along the rim. On Variety 1 they all appear along the rim, while on Variety 2 three of the stars are located in the field beneath the eagle. Dora Doscher (sometimes called &###x201C;Doris&###x201D;) served as MacNeil&###x2019;s model for Liberty. She would go on to have a multi-faceted career as actress, lecturer, and advice columnist.

There has historically been some confusion over whether it was Doscher or another model, Irene MacDowell, who posed for MacNeil, but a convincing majority of the evidence points to Doscher&###x2019;s participation. The wear and thus the grading of circulation specimens of the SLG are different between Types Two and Three. The date on the bottom of the obverse was raised slightly on Liberty&###x2019;s pedestal, causing it to wear badly in circulation.

In 1925, the design was amended to recess the date, alleviating the issue. You can have a fairly unworn coin in Types 1 and 2 but have a date that is faded for this reason. Because of the high degree of detail and dynamism in this design, the quality of strikes varied considerably. Some areas were particularly prone to being weakly struck, especially Liberty&###x2019;s head and right leg and the rivets on her shield. The SLQ was only struck for 15 years, from 1916 to 1930.

No quarters were issued in 1931, and in 1932 John Flanagan&###x2019;s now-iconic portrait of George Washington was introduced in honor of the President&###x2019;s 200th birthday. Washington&###x2019;s presence on the denomination was supposed to be tempo. The mint mark "D" for Denver or "S" for San Francisco may be found at the base of the wall, just to the left of Liberty's visible foot.

The Standing Liberty quarter is the only 20th-century regular issue U. Coin for which no proof coins were struck. The Standing Liberty quarter before 1925 typically had its date worn off through extensive circulation. By late 1924, Mint officials realized there was a problem with the quarter in circulation. Quarters were returning to the Mint with the date completely worn off.

Unwilling to seek another act of Congress, Mint officials made the step on which the date appears recessed into the design, rather than raised from it. This change solved the problem; quarters from 1925 are thus noted because they have their dates survived intact. Many Standing Liberty quarters remained in circulation until silver coins began to be hoarded by the public in 1964, prompting the change to base-metal pieces. I aim to please and win happy customers.

&###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &###xA0; &##xA0. We aim to please and win happy customers. The most sought after Standing Liberty Quarters are the 1916 and 1918/7-S overdate. Only 1.36 million of the 1923-S Standing Liberty Quarter was issued, one of the lowest of all mintages in the series. Mint State survivors are in limited supply, but they are proportionally more available than the mintage would suggest.

Surely placing a topless Miss Liberty on our coinage would be okay; we're an enlightened nation, right? The Standing Liberty Quarter design came about with a bare-breasted Liberty initially. There has been much speculation into why McNeil's design was selected and what the symbolism meant. Was this wartime propaganda meant to imply, come get your succor from the breast of the world's mother?

Citizens' groups rallied their memberships to lobby Congress to have the disgusting coin recalled. Congress had little choice but to submit to the clamor.

Dora Doscher (sometimes called “Doris”) served as MacNeil’s model for Liberty. There has historically been some confusion over whether it was Doscher or another model, Irene MacDowell, who posed for MacNeil, but a convincing majority of the evidence points to Doscher’s participation. The date on the bottom of the obverse was raised slightly on Liberty’s pedestal, causing it to wear badly in circulation.

Some areas were particularly prone to being weakly struck, especially Liberty’s head and right leg and the rivets on her shield. No quarters were issued in 1931, and in 1932 John Flanagan’s now-iconic portrait of George Washington was introduced in honor of the President’s 200th birthday. Washington’s presence on the denomination was supposed to be tempo The mint mark "D" for Denver or "S" for San Francisco may be found at the base of the wall, just to the left of Liberty's visible foot.

The item "1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202" is in sale since Friday, April 5, 2019. This item is in the category "Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ US\Quarters\Standing Liberty (1916-30)". The seller is "baycoastal" and is located in Campbell, California. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Grade: XF 40
  • Circulated/Uncirculated: Circulated
  • Denomination: $.25
  • Certification Number: 81079485
  • Year: 1923
  • Composition: Silver
  • Mint Location: San Francisco
  • Coin: Standing Liberty Quarter
  • Certification: PCGS

1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202    1923 S-Mint Standing Liberty. 25 Silver Quarter Rare Key Date PCGS XF40 2202